CS 61B
Data Structures

Prof. Jonathan Shewchuk
jrs@cory.eecs
(But ask most questions on the CS 61B Piazza discussion group and send most private requests to cs61b@cory.eecs so the TAs can respond too.)

Spring 2014
Mondays 1–2 pm and Wednesdays noon–2 pm
Wheeler Hall Auditorium


Textbooks

Information

Work


Lectures

The following schedule is tentative. There may be changes as the semester progresses, so check here periodically. You are responsible for knowing and keeping up with the readings listed below; there won't be reminders in class.

Labs, homeworks, and projects that are currently available can be accessed by clicking on them. Webcasts and podcasts of past lectures are offered by Berkeley's Educational Technology Services through their Webcast Berkeley page. Click on the icons in the schedule below to view past lectures. Lectures are not broadcast live, but they should be available within a day or two after they happen.

Some lecture notes can be obtained by clicking on the lecture titles (for ASCII) or the PostScript or PDF links (which save paper). Please understand that they are lecture notes, and that they were written so that I would have something to say in class. I write them for me, not you, and I make them available as a courtesy to you. I edit them after class to make sure they say the same thing I said in class. If I receive complaints that my lectures and lecture notes do not differ, I will stop making lecture notes available. For related reasons, I will not make the lecture notes for a class available until after the class has taken place.

Topic Reading Due
1: January 22 Course overview Sierra & Bates, pp. 1–9, 18–19, 84 .
2: January 22 Using objects S & B, Chapter 2; pp. 54–58, 154–160, 661, 669 .
January 24 . . Lab 1
3: January 27 Defining classes S & B, pp. 71–74, 76, 85, 240–249, 273–281, 308–309 .
4: January 29 Types; conditionals S & B, pp. 10–14, 49–53, 75, 78–79, 86, 117, 286–287, 292, 660 Homework 1
5: January 29 Loops & arrays I S & B, pp. 59–62, 83, 114–116, 293–300, 670 .
January 31 . . Lab 2
6: February 3 Loops & arrays II S & B, pp. 282–285 .
7: February 5 Linked lists I Goodrich & Tamassia, Section 3.2 Homework 2
8: February 5 Linked lists II G & T, Section 3.3 .
February 7 . . Lab 3
9: February 10 Stack & heap Sierra & Bates, pp. 77, 235–239, 258–265, 663 .
10: February 12 Inheritance S & B, Chapter 7; pp. 28–33, 250–257 Homework 3
11: February 12 Testing; equals() S & B, pp. 95–109, 662 .
February 14 . . Lab 4
February 17 President's Day . .
12: February 19 Abstract classes S & B, Chapter 8 .
13: February 19 Java packages S & B, pp. 154–160, 587–591, 667–668 .
February 21 . . Lab 5
February 22 . . Project 1
14: February 24 MIDTERM I covers Lectures 1–12 .
15: February 26 Exceptions S & B, pp. 315–338 Homework 4
16: February 26 More Java S & B, pp. 189, 283 .
February 28 . . Lab 6
17: March 3 Game Trees . .
18: March 5 Encapsulation S & B, pp. 80–84 Homework 5
19: March 5 Encapsulated lists S & B, p. 664 .
March 7 . . Lab 7
20: March 10 Asymptotic analysis Goodrich & Tamassia, Chapter 4 .
21: March 12 Dictionaries & hash tables G & T, Sections 9.1, 9.2, 9.5–9.5.1 .
22: March 12 Hash codes; stacks & queues G & T, Chapter 5 .
March 14 . . Lab 8
23: March 17 Algorithm analysis G & T, Chapter 4 .
24: March 19 Trees and traversals G & T, Chapter 7 Homework 6
25: March 19 Priority queues G & T, Sections 8.1–8.3 .
March 21 . . Lab 9
March 24–28 Spring Recess
26: March 31 Binary search trees G & T, Section 10.1 .
27: April 2 Balanced search trees G & T, Section 10.4 Project 2
28: April 2 Graphs G & T, Sections 13.1–13.3 .
April 4 . . Lab 10
29: April 7 Weighted graphs G & T, Sections 13.5.1, 13.6–13.6.1 .
30: April 9 Four sorting algorithms G & T, Sections 8.2.2, 8.3.5, & 11.1 Homework 7
31: April 9 Quicksort G & T, Section 11.2 .
April 11 . . Lab 11
32: April 14 MIDTERM II covers Lectures 1–29 .
33: April 16 Disjoint Sets G & T, Section 11.4 Homework 8
34: April 16 Sorting & selection G & T, Section 11.3.1 & 11.5 .
April 18 . . Lab 12
35: April 21 Radix sort G & T, Section 11.3.2 .
36: April 23 Splay trees G & T, Section 10.3 Homework 9
37: April 23 Amortized analysis . .
April 25 . . Lab 13
38: April 28 Randomized analysis . .
39: April 30 Garbage collection G & T, Sections 14.1.2–14.1.3 Project 3
40: April 30 Augmenting data structures . .
May 2 . . Lab 14
41: May 5 Sorting video . .
42: May 7 Review . Homework 10
May 9 . . Lab 15

The FINAL EXAM will take place on Tuesday, May 13, from 8 am to 11 am in a location to be announced by the university late in the semester. (CS 61B is in Exam Group 5.)


Course Description (from the catalogue)

Fundamental dynamic data structures, including linear lists, queues, trees, and other linked structures; arrays, strings, and hash tables. Storage management. Elementary principles of software engineering. Abstract data types. Algorithms for sorting and searching. Introduction to the Java programming language.

Prerequisites: CS 61A or Engineering 7. (The catalogue says “with a grade of B– or better,” but I've never seen this rule enforced.)

Grading



“Let's see if I remember this. Do I splay the pineapple pizza through the Ted Nugent tea cozies? Or should I zig-zig the Versace laptops through Katy Perry first?”
cs61b@cory.eecs